More about Montessori

VERTICAL GROUPING

 

  • Vertical grouping is when children of different age groups are grouped together in a classroom (e.g. 3 – 6 years of age)

  • Vertical grouping is often found in schools that make use of open classrooms.

  • A group of children who all at roughly the same stage of development will naturally invite comparison and breed jealousy.  Vertical grouping can help to alleviate this.  How well they compare to same-age pupils is less important.

  • When an adult if uncertain of something, they often turn to a person who has more experience for help.  It is a child’s natural impulse to consult the more experienced.  In a group of children of mixed ages, the older, more experienced person need not be the directress (teacher); it may be another child.

  • Having mixed age groups so that you can direct a child who needs help to a more experienced child has a number of advantages.  Firstly, some of the materials do not provide inherent feedback in the control of error e.g. the sound cylinders.  The directress can ask the uncertain child to consult a more experienced child.  The second advantage is that the child who lacks self-esteem can be greatly encouraged by having another child come to him for help.  Thirdly, there is social interaction between the older and younger children in the classroom.  The older children develop leadership roles/qualities, which in turn further develop their self-confidence.  The older children can give new children that come into the classroom simple practical life and sensorial presentations.  Another advantage is that a mixed age group working together provides indirect preparation in the younger children, who watch and begin to absorb the activities that they will be doing at a later stage.

It also allows the older children to realize the own progress when they see the younger children busy with exercises that they mastered some time ago.

  • The social atmosphere of the classroom benefits from the children helping each other.  It becomes a fact of life that some people are more experienced in certain things and you in others.  The children also realize that everyone needs a little help from others.

  • The Montessori environment is a lovely special place where children are fee to work together if they like.  Montessori children are encouraged to look to one another for answers and ideas as much as they look to adults.

        VERTICAL GROUPING

 

  • Vertical grouping is when children of different age groups are    grouped together in a classroom (e.g. 3 – 6 years of age)

  • Vertical grouping is often found in schools that make use of open classrooms.

  • A group of children who all at roughly the same stage of development will naturally invite comparison and breed jealousy. Vertical grouping can help to alleviate this.  How well they compare to same-age pupils is less important.  When an adult if uncertain of something, they often turn to a person who has more experience for help.It is a child’s natural impulse to consult the more experienced.  In a group of children of mixed ages, the older, more experienced person need not be the directress (teacher); it may be another child.

  • Having mixed age groups so that you can direct a child who needs help to a more experienced child has a number of advantages.  Firstly, some of the materials do not provide inherent feedback in the control of error e.g. the sound cylinders.  The directress can ask the uncertain child to consult a more experienced child.  The second advantage is that the child who lacks self-esteem can be greatly encouraged by having another child come to him for help.  Thirdly, there is social interaction between the older and younger children in the classroom.

  • The older children develop leadership roles/qualities, which in turn further develop their self-confidence. The older children can give new children that come into the classroom simple practical life and sensorial presentations.  Another advantage is that a mixed age group working together provides indirect preparation in the younger children, who watch and begin to absorb the activities that they will be doing at a later stage.

        It also allows the older children to realize their own progress

        when they see the younger children busy with exercises that

        they mastered some time ago.

  • The social atmosphere of the classroom benefits from the children helping each other.  It becomes a fact of life that some people are more experienced in certain things and you in others.  The children also realize that everyone needs a little help from others.

  • The Montessori environment is a lovely special place where children are free to work together if they like.  Montessori children are encouraged to look to one another for answers and ideas as much as they look to adults.

CLASS SIZES

At Little Learners, we have small classes to allow for lots of personal attention. We only have between 8 & 10 children in our Toddler Class and between 10 & 12 children in the Pre-School class.

 

SENSITIVE PERIODS

 

‘A sensitive period is a block of time when a child is absorbed in one characteristic in his environment to the exclusion of all others.’  These periods help the individual to acquire certain characteristics and they occur in a very definite and limited time.

 

Montessori believes that children pass through definite periods in which they reveal psychic aptitudes, which later disappear.  That is why at certain stages a child shows an intense and extraordinary interest in certain exercises.  As sensitive period is like a burning passion, ‘a keen emotion first arises from the depths of the unconscious, and sets in motion a marvelous creative activity in contact with the outside world, thus building up consciousness.’

 

Montessori said about sensitive periods that one would be missing the bus if one did not identify a sensitive period and that learning that skill at a later stage would not be nearly as effective.  Montessori refers to it as ‘a flame that burns without consuming,’ as the work does not cause fatigue.  In fact this ‘work’ makes him feel better, stronger and calmer because through this work he is creating himself.

 

Some of the typical Sensitive Periods are as follows:

 

  1. Sensitive Period for Language (3 months – 5 years)

  2. Sensitive Period for Order (3 months – 3 ½ years)

  3. Sensitive Period for Small Objects (2 ½ to 8 years)

  4. Sensitive Period for Learning Good Manners (2 ½ to 6 years)

  5. Sensitive Period for Social Relations (2 ½ - 5/6 years)

  6. Sensitive Period for Movement (1 – 2 years)

 

At the age of three, the child is concurrently in three sensitive periods.  That being:

 

  1. Sensitive Period for Refinement of Motor Co-Ordination

  2. Sensitive Period for Order

  3. Sensitive Period for Detail

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now